Anthony Pym

Anthony Pym


Anthony Pym is Professor of Translation and Intercultural Studies at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain. He is President of the European Society for Translation Studies, a fellow in the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies, Visiting Researcher at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, and Professor Extraordinary at the University of Stellenbosch. He is the author of Exploring Translation Theories (Routledge, 2010), The Moving Text: Localization, Translation, and Distribution (Benjamins, 2004), Negotiating the Frontier: Translators and Intercultures in Hispanic History (1999), and Method in Translation History (1998). Professor Pym has collaborated with the Nida Institute in the translation and update of his book On Translator Ethics (Ottawa, forthcoming).

Articles


Articles
Translation without Borders
Edwin Gentzler

Abstract: Traditional definitions of translation invariably include a border over or through which translation is ‘carried across’. Studies in semiotics suggest that the borders tend to be more multiple and permeable than traditionally conceived. What if we erase the border completely and rethink translation as an always ongoing process of every communication?

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Interviews
Interview with Robert J.C. Young

translation editor Siri Nergaard met with Robert J. C. Young in New Your City on September14th 2012 at the Nida Research Symposium.

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Reviews
Reflections on Translation
Paschalis Nikolaou

How does one reflect on translation? For Susan Bassnett, one of the world’s foremost thinkers in translation studies – it is a field she helped into being, no less – this is a question answered incrementally, and over time. Her Reflections on Translation collects critical pieces that appeared, for the most part, in the ITI Bulletin; their significance immediately connects to the author’s name, but the usefulness of – and often, sheer enjoyment in – reading them owes also to an adopted style and approach to communicating what’s really important. 

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